Latest News from Sul Ross October 18, 2013

SULLY’S SHOWCASE NOV. 16 AT GALLEGO CENTER
    Potential students and their families will have the chance to explore academic opportunities and campus life.during Sully’s Showcase, scheduled Saturday, Nov. 16 at Sul Ross State University.                       

    Sully’s Showcase will be held from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and is free of charge. Prospective students will receive free T-shirts and may register for the chance to win a $1,000 scholarship. Online registration and more information may be found at:  http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=ml7ibxkab&oeidk=a07...
    “We are excited abut the opportunity to showcase our academic programs and our beautiful campus,” said MaryBeth Marks, assistant vice president for Enrollment Management. “We have a small, private university feel, but at a very affordable, public university price.”
    Prospective students and their families can learn about major requirements, degree programs, sponsored activities and course offerings. Information on admissions, financial aid, housing and student activities will be provided. Students and faculty will be available to discuss programs and research as well.
    “Sul Ross is among the lowest in the state in tuition and fees, and is a safe and secure campus with modern living facilities, fun student organizations and many outdoor activities to enjoy,” Marks said. “ Sul Ross faculty take pride in preparing students for their future careers by providing hands-on learning and state of the art technology in our classrooms.”         
    For more information, contact Shannon Stockbridge, assistant director of admissions, admissions@sulross.edu or (432) 837-8053.
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SUL ROSS HOSTS NIRA RODEO OCT. 24-26
    Collegiate rodeo returns to its birthplace as Sul Ross State University hosts the annual National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association event Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 24-26.
    Competition begins nightly at 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24 and 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26 in the San Antonio Livestock Exposition (S.A.L.E.) Arena at the Turner Range Animal Science Center. General Admission is $6. Children under 12 and Sul Ross faculty, staff, and students with ID will be admitted free of charge. Slacks will be held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25-26, beginning at 9 a.m. each day. There is no charge for the slack.
     Teams competing include: Angelo State University, San Angelo; Clarendon College; Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, N.M.; Frank Phillips College, Borger; Howard College, Big Spring; New Mexico Jr. College, Hobbs, N.M.; Odessa College; Ranger Junior College; South Plains College, Levelland; Tarleton State University, Stephenville; Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Vernon Junior Regional College; Weatherford College; West Texas A&M University, Canyon; and Western Texas College, Snyder.
     On Saturday evening, one of four candidates will be crowned Miss Rodeo 2013. The reigning Queen is Molly Jo Collins, Balmorhea. Rodeo Queen 2013 candidates are: Ali Burks, Copperas Cove; Keyla Kothman, Sheffield; Danielle Lucero Gardendale; and Katie Savage, Pearland.

Rodeo Queen candidates

2013 Sul Ross Rodeo Queen candidates are (from left): Keyla Kothman, Sheffield; Ali Burks, Copperas Cove; Danielle Lucero, Gardendale; and Katie Savage, Pearland. Coronation will take place Saturday, Oct. 26, in the S.A.L.E. Arena prior to the rodeo. (Photo by Dana Jones)

     Sul Ross boasts nine national team championship teams, seven men’s and two women’s; and 24 individual event titles. The rodeo team won men’s championships in 1949-1952– the first first four years of NIRA competition -- as well as 1962, 1982, and 1983. Sul Ross garnered women’s crowns in 1962 and 1985. Only Southeastern Oklahoma State University claims as many national team championships, five men’s and four women’s.
      Harley May, a member of the first three national championship teams, won eight national collegiate titles, three world championships in steer wrestling on the professional circuit and was inducted into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in 1979. He returned to coach the Sul Ross rodeo teams from 1994-1998.
May won the all-around men’s championship from 1949-51; bareback riding in 1949; bull riding in 1949-50; and saddle bronc riding in 1950-51. Tex Martin (1953) and Cody Lambert (1982) also won men’s all-around titles, while Jo Gregory Knox, (1951), Elisabeth Prude Longbotham (1953), and Donna Saul (1962) claimed all-around women’s crowns.
Other Sul Ross national individual champions are: bull riders Johnny Ackel (1952), Ira Akers (1953), Tex Martin (1954), and George Eads (1962); saddle bronc rider Don Lee Smith (1958) and Bill James, who tied for first in calf roping in 1961 and won team roping in 1962.
    In women’s competition, Charlotte Martin (1954) and Saul (1962) won goat tying championships; Saul won calf tying in 1961; and Jayne Gentry won breakaway roping in 1985.
    Present team member Jessica Jo Wood, Terrebone, Ore.,  finished fifth in goat tying at the 2013 NIRA national finals after winning the Southwest Region title. As of Oct. 15, she ranked fourth in this season’s regional standings.

Sul Ross Rodeo Team

Top, from left: Damon Thorn, Sam Powers, Toby Lee, KC Frier, Coley Shipp; front: Coach Jacob Gernentz, Samantha Kauk, Keyla Kothman, Autumn Rusher, Katie Savage, Sadie Sacra, Jessica Wood, Katlyn Rusher, Parker Littlejohn and Danielle Lucero. (Photo by Dana Jones)

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SUL ROSS STUDENT WINS POSTER AWARD AT RANGE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY MEETING
    Sul Ross State University student Jose Etchart, El Paso, won a poster award and cash prize at the annual meeting of the Texas Section of the Society for Range Management, held Oct. 9-11 in Fort Worth.
    Etchart, who is a McNair Program Scholar, presented a poster “Desert Big Game Water Utilization,” on his undergraduate research project. He will display the poster and make an oral presentation, “Use of Camera Traps to Determine Big Bame Water Utilization at Nine Point Mesa Ranch,” at the Oct. 23 McNair-Tafoya Symposium at Sul Ross.
    The Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program is designed to encourage first generation, low-income students and minority undergraduates to consider careers in college teaching as well as prepare for doctoral study. Students who participate in the program are provided with research opportunities and faculty mentors.
    Named in honor of the astronaut who died in the 1986 space shuttle explosion, the McNair Program was established at Sul Ross in November 2007. It is funded through the Department of Education’s TRIO programs.
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SUL ROSS STUDENT RESEARCH FEATURED AT OCT. 23 MCNAIR-TAFOYA SYMPOSIUM
    Undergraduate research will be presented at the sixth annual McNair-Tafoya Symposium Wednesday, Oct. 23 at Sul Ross State University. The symposium begins at 3 p.m. in the Espino Conference Center, Morgan University Center, and is free and open to the public.
    Five oral presentations and 15 poster presentations from this year’s McNair Program scholars will be featured. The annual symposium recognizes excellence in undergraduate research across the campus.
    Oral presentations, selected by the faculty symposium committee who juried the papers for presentation, are:
    * “Use of Camera Traps to Determine Big Game Water Utilization at Nine Point Mesa Ranch,” by Jose Etchart, El Paso. Faculty mentor, Dr. Louis Harveson.
    * “Bawdy language in the Bard’s Body: A Study of Shakespeare’s Use of Sexual Imagery,” by Matthew Hall, Era. Faculty mentor, Dr. Sharon Hileman.
    * “The Relationship Between Perceived Self-Efficacy and Stress Levels Among College Students With Disabilities,” by Kaylee Kocian, Florence. Faculty mentor, Dr. Christopher Estepp.
    * “ Wolf Spiders Associate Food with Predator Cues in a T-Maze,” by Robert LeBlanc, Fort Davis. Dr. Christopher Ritzi, faculty mentor.
    * “ Utilization of Fence Modifications by Pronghorn (antilocapra americana) in the Marathon Basin,” by Jim Wyche, Midland. Dr. Bonnie Warnock, faculty mentor.
    Poster presentations will be made by Wyche; Hall; Etchart; LeBlanc; Kocian; Fernanda Arroyo, Presidio; Rebecca Blomquist, Granger; Megan Downing, Midland; Michael Gallardo, El Paso; Annabel Gallegos, El Paso; Angela Greenroy, Alpine; Kassandra Hernandez, El Paso; Catherien Smietana, Alpine; Daniel Tidwell, Sachse; and Emily Urbanosky, Caldwell.
    The Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program is designed to encourage first generation, low-income students and minority undergraduates to consider careers in college teaching as well as prepare for doctoral study. Students who participate in the program are provided with research opportunities and faculty mentors.
    Named in honor of the astronaut who died in the 1986 space shuttle explosion, the McNair Program was established at Sul Ross in November 2007. It is funded through the Department of Education’s TRIO programs.    For more information, contact Mary Bennett, McNair Program director,  (432) 837-8478 or mbennett@sulross.edu.
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MUSEUM OF THE BIG BEND HOSTS EN PLEIN AIR PAINTING CLASS NOV. 1-3
    Noted Western artist Mike Capron will conduct an en plein air (“in the open air”) painting class Friday-Sunday, Nov. 1-3 at the Museum of the Big Bend, Sul Ross State University.
    Capron will give a gallery talk at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 at the Museum, discussing Western illustrator Frederic Remington, whose works are currently on exhibition. Classes will be held at Kokernot Lodge on Saturday, Nov. 2, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (Lunch on your own from noon-1 p.m.) and Sunday, Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-noon. Cost is $150 per student, with students responsible for their art supplies. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. To register, contact Noemi Acosta, (432) 837-8345 or email nacosta@sulross.edu.
    Capron’s works have been exhibited in Trappings of Texas for 26 years, along with other museums across the Southwest, and in private collections, book illustrations and other mediums.
    Kokernot Lodge is the site of the summer Art Colony, held in the 1930s. Sstudents are encouraged to the learn the techniques and skills in creating works in nature. Both oil and watercolorists at all levels are encouraged to attend.
    En plein air is particularly used to describe the act of painting outdoors. Artists have long painted outdoors, but in the mid-19th century, working in natural light became particularly important to the Barbizon school and Impressionism. Popularity increased in the 1870s with the introduction of paints in tubes.
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