Latest News from Sul Ross December 16, 2013

3 FOOTBALL COACHING FINALISTS NAMED.

3 FINALISTS NAMED FOR SUL ROSS FOOTBALL COACH; CAMPUS VISITS DEC. 17-19
    John Pearce, Scott Carey and Braxton Harris have been selected as finalists for the Sul Ross State University head football coaching positions. They were selected from a pool of over 30 candidates.
    Pearce, defensive line coach at Blinn College, Brenham, will visit campus Tuesday, Dec. 17 for a series of interviews. Carey, running game coordinator and offensive line coach at Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colo., will be interviewed Wednesday, Dec. 18; and Harris, co-defensive coordinator at Texas Lutheran University, Seguin, will be at Sul Ross Thursday, Dec. 19.
    Each candidate will have a full day’s interview and will meet with interim President Quint Thurman, at an open forum with the community at 10 a.m. in Lawrence Hall, Room 300, and in closed sessions with student-athletes and the search advisory group.
    Pearce joined the Blinn College staff last season after nine years at Prairie View A&M University, including two as defensive coordinator. Other collegiate coaching stops include Catholic University (Washington, D.C.); Bowie State University (Prince George County, Md.); Shepherd College (now University, Shepherdstown, W. Va.); and Norfolk (Va.) State University. A 1991 graduate of the University of Delaware, Pearce received a Master’s degree from Bowie State.
    Carey has served two stints at Colorado School of Mines, from 2002-2005 and 2012 to the present. In between, he was offensive coordinator and offensive line coach at Tarleton State University (2006-2010). He received a Bachelor’s degree from Tarleton State, where he was a four-year football letter winner, and a Master’s degree from Northeastern State University (Tahlequah, Okla.), where he served as a graduate assistant coach.
    Harris, a member of the TLU football staff since 2011, previously coached at Waco High School and spent four years at his alma mater, the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, first as a student assistant and later as wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator (2006-2009).
    He played quarterback at UMHB from 2003-2005, and was a member of the 2004 NCAA Division III national finalist team.
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SUL ROSS SCULPTURE MAY BE COMPLETED BY SPRING
    A life-size sculpture of Sul Ross State University’s namesake may be completed and installed on campus within the next few months.
    A bronze sculpture of Lawrence Sullivan Ross, by noted sculptor Paul Tadlock, New Braunfels, will depict the former Texas governor and President of Texas A&M as he appeared in his later years as a statesman and educator. The sculpture will stand slightly over six feet tall and will be located near Lawrence Hall. Tadlock earlier created a bronze likeness of a Lobo wolf, used as a fund-raiser by the Sul Ross Alumni Association.
    A $97,000 gift from 1959 graduate Charlie Nichols and his wife, Arlene, Fort Worth, provided funding for the sculpture. Funding for the base – made of Texas pink granite – and three plaques will be provided for by a separate donation.
    “We hope to have an unveiling of the sculpture next spring,” said Dr. Quint Thurman, interim President. According to Thurman, further details of the project will be forthcoming as they are available and regular progress reports will be issued.
    Lawrence Sullivan “Sul” Ross (1838-1898) was a Texas Ranger, soldier, statesman and university president. He served two terms as governor of Texas (1888-91) and was a champion of public education. Following his governorship, he became president of the troubled Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A&M University). Under his direction, enrollment increased, many new buildings were constructed and the institution’s reputation was restored.
       Sul Ross State University was created by an act of the 35th Legislature in 1917 as a state normal college to train teachers. Construction was delayed due to America’s entry into World War I, and the college opened for classes in the summer of 1920, under the name of Sul Ross State Normal College. Subsequent name changes were Sul Ross State Teachers College (1923); Sul Ross State College (1949); and Sul Ross State University (1969).
    To make a donation to assist with the funding of the base, contact Karen Brown, Alumni Association, (432) 837.8443 or at kbrown2@sulross.edu.
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