Undergraduate Courses

2014-2016 Catalog

criminal justice photos

  Subject titles and course numbers in parentheses at the end of the course descriptions below represent the course equivalent in the Texas Common Course Numbering system.

1301 (CRIJ) Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0) History and philosophy of criminal justice and ethical considerations; crime defined; its nature and impact; overview of criminal justice system; prosecution and defense; trial process; correction. (Required)

1307 (CRIJ) Crime in America (3-0) American crime problems in historical perspective; social and public policy factors affecting crime; impact of crime and trends; social characteristics of specific crimes; prevention of crimes. (Formerly CJ 1305)

1313 (CRIJ) Juvenile Justice System (3-0) Study of the juvenile justice system and juvenile crime and delinquency. Theories of delinquency.

1320 Police Academy I (3-0)1st of 4 part credit for Police Academy. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 1321, 1322, 1323

1321 Police Academy II (3-0)2nd of 4 part credit for Police Academy. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 1320, 1322, 1323

1322 Police Academy III (3-0)3rd of 4 part credit for Police Academy. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 1320, 1321, 1323

1323 Police Academy IV (3-0)4th of 4 part credit for Police Academy. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 1320, 1321, 1322

2302 Basic Skills for CJ (3-0) Thinking skills such as critical thinking, legal reasoning and social-scientific thinking.  Basics of Criminal Justice library research including Internet and data sources.  Criminal Justice communication skills including report and paper writing, and testifying.  Ethics and professionalism.

2313 (CRIJ) Correctional Systems and Practices (3-0) Corrections in the criminal justice system; correctional role; institutional operations; alternatives to institutionalization; treatment and rehabilitation; current and future issues.

2321 Special Topics (3-0) Study of selected issues in Criminal Justice. May be repeated when topic varies.

2323 (CRIJ) Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement (3-0) Police authority; responsibilities; constitutional restraints; laws of arrest, search and seizure; police liability. (Formerly 2305) (Required)

2328 (CRIJ) Police Systems and Practices (3-0) The police profession; organization of law enforcement systems; the police role; police discretion; ethics; police community interaction; current and future issues. (Formerly CJ 2304)

3302 Victimology, Victim Services and Victims' Rights (3-0) A study of victims, victimization and the consequences of victimization, including victims of sexual assault and child abuse; victim perception, self-help and prevention of victimization; victimization surveys and other data sources; history of victims' rights and the victims' rights movement; victims' rights and services.

3303 Crime and Justice in the Movies (3-0) Examination of the interrelationships between cinema, reality, and public opinion. Examination of stereotypes and assumptions shown in cinema as compared to fact. Study of professional, ethical, and historical issues in criminal justice as reflected in movies.

3304 Wildlife Law Enforcement (3-0) Application of investigative and evidentiary procedures to wildlife law enforcement; legal basis for wildlife laws; federal and state wildlife laws, role of wildlife law enforcement in wildlife management.

3307 Organized Crime (3-0) Analysis of crime problems of an organized nature; economic impact upon society; laws regulating organized crime; investigation techniques.

3311 Women and Crime (3-0) This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding women and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include women as victims of crime, as perpetrators of crime, and as workers within the system.

3312 Criminal Investigation (3-0) Investigative theory, collection and preservation of evidence, sources of information, interview and interrogation, uses of forensic sciences, case and trial preparation, photography.

3316 Domestic Violence (3-0) This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding victims and perpetrator characteristics, explanations for the violence, and explanations for the victim's behavior. Criminal justice responses to domestic violence situations both currently and historically will also be covered.

3317 White Collar Crime (3-0) This course is designed to familiarize the student with the special crimes that qualify as white collar crime.  By the end of the course, the student will be able to distinguish white collar offenses from other types of crimes.  Additionally, students will be familiar with the criminal justice system's contemporary responses to white collar crimes.

4301 Multicultural Studies in Criminal Justice (3-0) Understanding, communicating and working with persons from different cultures; basic human relations skills needed by those working in the criminal justice system; women in the criminal justice system; equal protection of the law and anti-discrimination; civil rights; sexual harassment and related laws; criminal justice ethics. (Required)

4302 Seminar in Special Problems in Criminal Justice (3-0) Exploration and analysis of contemporary problems related to police, courts and corrections. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

4303 Death Penalty in America (3-0) In this course we will review the public policy concerning the Death Penalty. We will further look into issues that may or may not affect the application of the death penalty within the various States. Both the history of the death penalty and the future application of abolition of the death penalty will be addressed.

4304 Criminology (3-0) Study of factors that contribute to crime; criminological theories; criminal types; research methods; types of crimes; crime trends. (Required)

4306 Gangs (3-0) The Gangs class is designed to introduce and guide students in the understanding of the advent and expansion of criminal gangs. Topics and discussion will focus on the history, organization, identification, and criminological theories surrounding both "street" and "prison" gangs. Emphasis will be placed on the spread of prison gangs in Texas prisons and their influence on Texas prison policy. Street gangs will be studied as an artifact of the "drug war".

4307 Internship (3-0) This course is designed to give students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to actual practice. Internship may be repeated twice for credit at different agencies. It is the Student's responsibility to find a suitable agency to intern for. Students must have a 3.0 GPA and must complete a minimum of 45 hours of supervised work time. (No person may obtain internship credit for full or part time paid employment). Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Majors only: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the Department Chair.

4308 Terrorism (3-0) This class is specifically designed to introduce students to the threat of terrorism both domestic and international. We will discuss the implications of all aspects of terrorism on U.S. society. Students will have an opportunity to research and present to the class specific topics of interest. We will address the religious, sociological, criminal, and legal issues of the police, prosecutors, and courts. Additional focus will be on the application of "The Patriot Act" as it impacts U.S. freedoms.

4309 Senior Seminar (3-0) Professional ethics and professionalism, role of the private sector in criminal justice, opportunities for employment and graduate study, criminal justice data sources, history and future of discipline and current developments. (Required) The final exam for this course for CJ majors will be the CJ Senior Exam which must be passed to graduate. Students will write a major student-competition level paper. Open to all juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: CJ 1301, 2305, and 4304.

4310 Deviant Subcultures (3-0) This course examines the roots, structures, habits and sociological implications of deviant subcultures.  The most obvious example of a deviant subculture are criminal gangs, either street gangs or prison gangs.

4311 Sexual Predators (3-0) This course examines the roots, structures, habits and sociological implications of sexual predators.  The most obvious example of sexual predators is the violent sexual serial killer. 

4312 Punishment (3-0) In this course we will review the public policy concerning the death penalty and punishment.  We will further look into issues that may or may not affect the use of the death penalty in the various states.

4313 Juvenile Delinquency (3-0) This course will focus on the nature and extent of delinquent behavior, theories of delinquency and their implications for intervention, and the cultural and social factors related to delinquency.

4315 Serial Killers (3-0) This class examines Serial Killers worldwide. Students will be exposed to numerous highly publicized Serial Killers, as well as many that are not so well known. This class will examine the root causes of these criminals and their impact on society.

4318 Homeland Security (3-0) This course will explore the creation and evolution of the Department of Homeland Security.

4319 School Violence (3-0) This class is designed to familiarize students with the sociological and legal issues concerning violence in schools.  The subject is not limited to the United States. 

4320 Forensic Ballistics - Handguns (3-0) This course is mainly a firearms examination course.  Students will learn the historical evolution Handguns and their relationship to changes in American society.  The identification of and differences between all forms Handguns will be emphasized.  This course will spend considerable time covering the usage and investigation of the criminal application of Handguns in crime, as well as, the tactical applications employed by law enforcement.  The course includes considerable “hands-on” time with actual firearms.

4321 Forensic Ballistics - Long Guns (3-0) This course is mainly a firearms examination course.  Students will learn the historical evolution of both Rifles and Shotguns and their relationship to changes in American society.  The identification of and differences between all forms of “long guns” will be emphasized.  This course will spend considerable time covering the usage and investigation of the criminal application of “Long guns” in crime, as well as, the tactical applications employed by law enforcement.  The course includes considerable “hands-on” time with actual firearms.