CJ 1301 (CRIJ 1301) Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0).  History and philosophy of criminal justice and ethical considerations; crime defined; its nature and impact; overview of criminal justice system; police prosecution and defense; trial process; corrections. (Required for CJ)

CJ 1302 Introduction to Homeland Security (3-0).  This course will introduce students to the organization, structure and function of Homeland Security at the federal, state, and local levels as well as in the civilian world. Constitutional issues and special criminal processing will also be discussed. (Required for HS)

CJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices (3-0).  The student will be introduced to topics related to the functioning of the courts and judiciary system including pre-trial services, right to counsel, grand juries, adjudication processes, rules of evidence, and post-trial appeals. Prerequisite: CJ 1310

CJ 1307 (CRIJ 1307) Crime in America (3-0).  American crime problems in historical perspective; social and public policy factors affecting crime; impact of crime and trends; social characteristics of specific crimes; prevention of crimes.

CJ 1310 Fundamentals of Criminal Law (3-0).  The student will be introduced to concepts of criminal law including the nature of law, historical development, major definitions, classification and elements of crime and criminal responsibility. Prerequisite: CJ 1301

CJ 1313 (CRIJ 1313) Juvenile Justice System (3-0).   Study of the juvenile justice system and juvenile crime and delinquency. Theories of delinquency.

CJ 2302 Basic Skills for Criminal Justice (3-0).  Thinking skills such as critical thinking, legal reasoning, and social-scientific thinking.  Basics of criminal justice library research including Internet and data sources.  Criminal justice communication skills including report and paper writing and testifying.  Ethics and Professionalism.

CJ 2313 (CRIJ 2313) Correctional Systems and Practices (3-0).   Corrections in the criminal justice system; correctional role; institutional operations; alternatives to institutionalization; treatment and rehabilitation; current and future issues.

CJ 2321 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3-0).  Study of selected issues in criminal justice.  May be repeated when topic varies.

CJ 2323 (CRIJ 2323) Aspects of Law Enforcement (3-0).  Police authority; responsibilities; constitutional restraints; laws of arrest, search and seizure; police liability.  (Required for CJ)

CJ 2328 (CRIJ 2328) Police Systems and Practices (3-0).  The police profession; organization of law enforcement systems; the police role; police discretion; ethics; police community interaction; current and future issues

CJ 2350 Current Issues in Criminal Justice (3-0). Students will explore the crucial incidents and issues within the criminal justice system that drive changes to the system. Within an ever-changing society, members of the public and members of the criminal justice system are sometimes in conflict requiring adaptation and evolution of the system. Students will examine the dynamics of police operations involving the use of deadly force, high speed pursuits, civil disobedience and unrest, natural disasters, and homeland security. Course may be repeated as topic changes. (Required for HS)

CJ 2351 Hate Crimes (3-0). This course will cover issues and current research on the causes, controls, and controversies surrounding hate crimes. Students will explore issues that foster hate crimes while learning how these criminal acts impact them.

CJ 2353 Crimes Against Children (3-0). This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issue surrounding child abuse and neglect.

CJ 2360 Introduction to Cybercrime (3-0). Students will explore the history and current state of computer-related crime. Beginning with an exploration of the development of ARPANET and progressing to the interweb and social media, ethical and criminal violations at home and in the workplace. Students will discuss current federal and state laws regarding cybercrime and identify crimes. An introduction to investigative methods and security protocols are also studied.

CJ 2362 Cybercrime Investigation (3-0). Students will analyze criminal acts that can be committed using a computer or the Internet, including narcotics and human trafficking, arms and weapons smuggling, and pornography distribution. The students will explore how those acts can be successfully investigated and prosecuted. Legal aspects of search and seizure, and proper procedures for handling digital evidence vis-à-vis the rules of evidence. An overview of the dark web will be included. Prerequisite: CJ 1301 or CJ 1302.

CJ 3101 Independent Study (1-0). Independent research of a selected topic in the Criminal Justice or Homeland Security field.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 3201 Independent Study (2-0).  Independent research of a selected topic in the Criminal Justice or Homeland Security field. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 3302 Victimology (3-0).  Provides an in-depth study of factors that affect victims of crime. Specific crimes are studied and remedies explored; victim precipitation, self-help and prevention of victimization, victimization surveys and other data sources; history of victims’ rights and the victims’ rights movement and victim services.

CJ 3303 Crime and Justice in the Movies (3-0).  Examination of the interrelationships between cinema, reality, and public opinion. Examination of stereotypes and assumptions shown in cinema as compared to fact. Study of professional, ethical, and historical issues in criminal justice as reflected in movies May be repeated when topic varies.

CJ 3304 Wildlife Law Enforcement (3-0).   Application of investigative and evidentiary procedures to wildlife law enforcement; legal basis for wildlife laws; federal and state wildlife laws; role of wildlife law enforcement in wildlife management.

CJ 3306 Community Corrections (3-0). This course will focus on community corrections in the criminal justice system as an alternative to institutionalization. Students will examine the treatment and rehabilitation concepts; probation and parole techniques; statutory and case law; case management; agency organization and administration.

CJ 3307 Organized Crime (3-0).  Analysis of crime problems of an organized nature; economic impact upon society; laws regulating organized crime; investigation techniques.

CJ 3311 Women and Crime (3-0).  This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding women and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include women as victims of crime, as perpetrators of crime, and as workers within the system.

CJ 3312 Criminal Investigation (3-0).  Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; case and trial preparation, photography.

CJ 3316 Domestic Violence (3-0).  This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding victims and perpetrators of domestic violence. Topics covered will include victim and perpetrator characteristics, explanations for the violence, and explanations for the victim’s behavior. Criminal justice responses to domestic violence situations both currently and historically will also be covered.

CJ 3317 White Collar Crime (3-0).  This course is deigned to familiarize the student with the special crimes that qualify as white collar crime.  By the end of the course the student will be able to distinguish white collar offenses from other types of crimes. Additionally, students will be familiar with the criminal justice system’s contemporary responses to white collar crimes.

CJ 3320 Emergency Management (3-0). This course covers risk management and disaster management theory, risk assessment, protection of critical infrastructure, Incident Command Systems, FEMA strategies, and other efforts to prevent and mitigate terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other large scale events. The role of all levels of government, military, and citizenry will be examined.

CJ 3321 Human Trafficking (3-0).  This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding human trafficking, including organization, finance, legislation, and regional perspectives.

CJ 3322 Cybercrime in the 21st Century (3-0).  Students will examine the developments and changes on the criminal justice system as a result of technology advancements and the introduction of computer-related crime. Discussions will include how criminals profit from technology, cybercrimes against persons, property, and institutions, and how criminal justices (law enforcement, prosecutors, courts, and corrections) have evolved to address cybercrime. Prerequisite: CJ 1301 or CJ 1302.

CJ 3340 Criminal Justice Ethics (3-0).  An Analysis of ethical dilemmas in the criminal justice system. An exploration into situational ethics relating to practices in Criminal Justice system. This course will address many ethical scenarios encountered by law enforcement, prosecutors, court officers, and corrections staff in the performance of their duties. Students will develop an understanding of the moral and ethical issues as well as how these dilemmas are resolved.

CJ 3341 Research Methods for Criminal Justice (3-1). This course provides as introduction to criminal justice research methods. Students will learn how to evaluate current and conduct contemporary research in the field of criminal justice. The course introduces students to terminology and tools of the scientific method. Several data collection techniques available to criminal justice researchers are explored and evaluated Students will learn how to evaluate academic research products in terns if their contribution to the fields of criminal justice, as well as to how to develop their own research problems. (Required for CJ and HS)

CJ 3362 Advanced Cybercrime Investigations (3-0). This course examines advanced investigation techniques in cybercrime cases, including internet frauds and schemes, issues in ecommerce, and threats to the national infrastructure. Cyber security policies, legal issues, and advanced investigative strategies, as well as the implications of investigations on a national and global scale will also be evaluated. Prerequisites: CJ 1301 or CJ 1302 and CJ 2362.

CJ 3363 Police Academy I (3-0).  First of 4-part credit for Police Academy.  Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 3364, 3365, 3366

CJ 3364 Police Academy II (3-0).  Second of 4-part credit for Police Academy.  Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 3363, 3365, 3366

CJ 3365 Police Academy III (3-0).  Third of 4-part credit for Police Academy.  Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 3363, 3364, 3366

CJ 3366 Police Academy IV (3-0).  Fourth of 4-part credit for Police Academy.  Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in the SRSU Police Academy and enrollment in 3363, 3364, 3365

CJ 4302 Seminar in Special Problems in Criminal Justice (3-0).  Exploration and analysis of contemporary problems related to police, courts or corrections. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

CJ 4303 Death Penalty (3-0).  This class is designed to examine the moral, legal, social and political aspects surrounding the death penalty issues. We will focus on the history of capital punishment both domestic and abroad. Issues of deterrence as well as how problems of discrimination are actively addressed. This course will utilize past legal and criminological research to argue both for and against the death penalty in America. This course is not designed to reinforce a student’s current belief-rather to challenge and broaden their understanding of a complicated and divisive criminal/political issue.

CJ 4304 Criminology (3-0).  Study of factors that contribute to crime; criminological theories; criminal typologies; crime trends; and criminal deviance.

CJ 4306 Gangs (3-0).  The Gangs class is designed to introduce and guide students in the understanding of the advent and expansion of criminal gangs. Topics and discussion will focus on the history, organization, identification, and criminological theories surrounding both “street” and “prison” gangs. Emphasis will be placed on the spread of prison gangs in Texas prisons and their influence on Texas prison policy. Street gangs will be studied as an artifact of the “Drug War”.

CJ 4307 Internship (3-0).  This course is designed to give students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to actual practice. Internship may be repeated twice for credit at different agencies. It is the student’s responsibility to find a suitable agency in which to intern. Students must have a 3.0 GPA and must complete a minimum of 45 hours of supervised work time. (No person may obtain internship credit for full or part time paid employment.)  Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Majors only: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the Department Chair.

CJ 4308 Terrorism (3-0).  This class is specifically designed to introduce students to the threat of terrorism both domestic and international. We will discuss the implications of all aspects of terrorism on U.S. society. Students will have an opportunity to research and present to the class specific topics of interest. We will address the religious, sociological, criminal and legal issues of the police, prosecutors, and courts. Additional focus will be on the application of” The Patriot Act” as it impacts U.S. Freedoms.

CJ 4309 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3-0).  A seminar course addressing various aspects of the criminal justice system; topics are subject to change with each semester.

CJ 4310 Deviant Subcultures (3-0).  This course examines the roots, structures, habits, and sociological implications of deviant subcultures.  The most obvious example of a deviant subculture is criminal gangs, either street gangs or prison gangs.

CJ 4311 Sexual Predators (3-0).  This course examines the roots, structures, habits and sociological implications of sexual predators. The most obvious example of sexual predators is the violent sexual serial killer.

CJ 4312 Punishment (3-0).  In this course, we will review the public policy concerning the death penalty and punishment.  We will further look into issues that may or may not affect the use of the death penalty within the various states.

CJ 4313 Juvenile Delinquency and Law (3-0).  This course will focus on the nature and extent of juvenile deviant behavior; deviancy theories; juvenile statutory and case law; judicial processes; policies and police practices related to juvenile justice.

CJ 4315 Serial Killers (3-0).  This class examines Serial Killers worldwide. Students will be exposed to numerous highly publicized Serial Killers, as well as many that are not so well known. This class will examine the root causes of these criminals and their impact on society.

CJ 4318 Advanced Homeland Security (3-0). This course will explore the creation and evolution of the Department of Homeland Security. Additional focus will be on the War on Terror, Weapons of Mass Destruction, new technologies and the   role of civilian organizations within Homeland Security.

CJ 4319 School Violence (3-0).  This class is designed to familiarize students with the sociological and legal issues concerning violence in schools. The subject is not limited to the United States.

CJ 4320 Forensic Ballistics: Handguns (3-0).   This course is mainly a firearms examination course. Students will learn the historical evolution Handguns and their relationship to changes in the American society. The identification of and differences between all forms Handguns will be emphasized. This course will spend considerable time covering the usage and investigation of the criminal application of Handguns in crime, as well as, the tactical applications employed by law enforcement. The course includes considerable “hands-on” time with actual firearms.

CJ 4321 Forensic Ballistics: Long Guns (3-0).  This course is mainly a firearms examination course. Students will learn the historical evolution of both Rifles and Shotguns and their relationship to changes in American society. The identification of and differences between all forms of “long guns” will be emphasized. This course will spend considerable time covering the usage and investigation of the criminal application of “long guns” in crime, as well as, the tactical applications employed by law enforcement. The course includes considerable “hands-on” time with actual firearms.

CJ 4322 Topics in Homeland Security (3-0).  This course covers current and emerging issues in the area of Homeland Security. Topics may include programs, emerging technologies, and legal trends in both the domestic arena and on the global stage.

CJ 4323 Transnational Crime (3-0).  This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of criminal organizations and their crimes on the global stage. Focus is particularly on those organizations and crimes that cross international boundaries. Areas of study include organized crime, trafficking in drugs, humans and weapons, piracy, and other crime groups and individual criminals. Global efforts and prevention, interdiction and punishment will also be covered. A particular focus will be on placing these issues in the context of Homeland Security and the war on terror.

CJ 4324 Immigration Law and Policy (3-0).  This course will focus on the history and development of immigration patterns and policies in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on policy issues as related to the work of Criminal Justice practitioners, particularly in the post-9/11 world. Students will also be expected to analyze policy impact on various groups of immigrants.

CJ 4330 Law Enforcement Administration (3-0).  Students will explore a comprehensive overview of practices within law enforcement administration. The history of law enforcement administration, the evolution of professional policing, as well as current issues and trends will be addressed. Emphasis will be places on issues related to human resource administration and the leadership skills required to successfully manage a law enforcement agency.

CJ 4331 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3-0). This course will be an advanced study of the various constitutional and other legal issues within all areas of criminal justice. Specific focus will be given to Texas laws, and US Supreme Court decisions affecting law enforcement or corrections. Prerequisite: CJ 1301 of CJ 1302. (Required for HS)

CJ 4332 Constitutional Issues in Corrections (3-0).  In the course, students will explore the origins of correctional systems, and how these systems and correctional philosophies have evolved over time. Students will also study the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendment rights and the theories behind those rights, as they relate to convicted prisoners and pretrial detainees. The impact of court decisions on prisons and jails. Liability and immunity of correctional personnel.

CJ 4333 Community Policing (3-0). Students will analyze ideas and ideals of Community Policing. Students will evaluate topics such as race, gender, economics, status, rural vs. urban, and other sensitive topics.

CJ 4334 Police Corruption (3-0). The class is designed to familiarize students with the sociological and legal issues concerning police corruption. Discussion will include specific “critical issues” such as, police militarization, the Police subculture, use of force, and the volatile political aspects of this issue.

CJ 4335 Drug Identification and Enforcement (3-0).  Lectures, demonstrations, and discussions that address all aspects of drug law, identification and analysis with an emphasis on those related to law enforcement.  Illicit drugs are examined for their societal impact.

CJ 4336 Prison Gangs (3-0). This course will focus on prison gangs, their origins and their evolution and growth within the prison system. The course will examine present-day prison gang activity in and out of the prison system and the impact of prison gangs on crime and the criminal justice system in the “free world.” By the end of the course, students will be able to understand and identify various prison gangs and have a detailed insight on the games criminals play.

CJ 4337 Forensic Science (3-0).  The science of fingerprints and DNA is examined; a study of criminalistics and the techniques employed in the recovery, classification, and identification of crime scene evidence; the analysis and interpretation of physical evidence.

CJ 4350 Independent Study (3-0).  The student will pursue an independent research or experiential learning project chosen by the student in consultation and approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor

CJ 4363 Introduction of Criminal Profiling (3-0). Students will explore the fundamental profiling. Discussions will include the definition of profiling, analysis of both the psychological basis and practical applications of criminal profiling, its uses, and historical applications in theory and practice. Students will explore the relationship between profiling and its application in crime and crime scene analysis, forensic science, and geographic profiling. Overview of applicable behavior-based criminal theories will be included. Prerequisite: CJ 130 or CJ 1302.

CJ 4365 Cyber Warfare (3-0). This course is an overview of cyber warfare including discussions on its strategy and impacts. Students will evaluate the use of cyber warfare by the military, terrorist, and criminal organizations. Students will examine computer network benefits and vulnerabilities, potential weaponry, and risk mitigation. Prerequisite: CJ 1301 or CJ 1302 and CJ 2360.

CJ 4367 Cybercrime Policy and Law (3-0). In this course, students will examine the impact of emerging technology on criminal justice policy, as well as the legal implications of changing criminal behaviors in the area of cybercrime. Particular attention will be paid to privacy issues, responses to various cybercrimes, and transnational issues such as cyber espionage and human trafficking. Prerequisite: CJ 2360.

CJ 4368 Multiculturalism in the Criminal Justice System (3-0). Understanding, communicating and working with persons from different cultures; basic human relations skills needed by those working in the criminal justice system; women in the criminal justice system; equal protection of the law and anti-discrimination, civil rights, sexual harassment and related laws; criminal justice ethics. (Required)

CJ 5301 Overview and Administration of the Criminal Justice System (3-0).  An advanced and detailed overview of the criminal justice system and its administration. This course will take a systematic perspective of our system of police, courts, and corrections. Focus will be placed on how the system, as a system, reacts to changes in legislation and social mood. Some emphasis will be placed on the legislative and political process surrounding U.S. criminal justice efforts.

CJ 5305 White Collar Crime (3-0).  This course will cover topics relating to white collar crimes across America.  Topics will cover both historical and contemporary perspectives as well as corporate and individual level offenses.

CJ 5306 Drug Abuse (3-0).  The focus of this course is on drug use, misuse and abuse in America.  Topics covered include history of drug use, laws concerning use and abuse, illicit and prescription drug abuse, drug control approaches and other relevant topics.

CJ 5308 Special Populations in Criminal Justice (3-0).  This course will explore issues related to minorities at all levels of the system from three perspectives: employees, victims, and offenders.  At the end of the course, the student should have developed a knowledge of and appreciation for the complexity of the effect of the criminal justice system on the lives of minorities in this country.

CJ 5310 Capital Punishment (3-0).  In this course, we will review the public policy concerning the death penalty.  We will further look into issues that may or may not affect the application of the death penalty within the various states.  Both the history of the death penalty and the future application or abolition of the death penalty will be addressed.

CJ 5311 Advanced Law Enforcement Administration (3-0).  Management issues in modern police agencies including hiring, retention, training, dismissal, human relations and cultural sensitivity. Communication, management styles, policy development, effectiveness, problem-solving and community policing are also covered.

CJ 5313 Seminar in Policing (3-0).  This advanced level course will focus on the history and development of modern professional policing. Emphasis will be placed on the evolving role of police in a democracy as well as the trends toward community oriented policing styles.

CJ 5314 Seminar in Corrections (3-0).  A course on the evolution of corrections. Theories of punishment as well as correctional management techniques will be addressed. This course will go beyond the concepts of institution corrections and will explore modern correctional alternatives and special topics relevant to corrections.

CJ 5315 Seminar in Courts and Judiciary (3-0).  A Specialized course, which will focus on the theories of American justice. Attention will be paid to the structure of the U.S. justice

system. A portion of the course will cover the role of each judicial element Federal, State and Local Courts. Students should expect some exposure to case briefs and legal research. (Required for CJ Masters)

CJ 5316 Women and Crime (3-0).  This course will cover topics relating to women and their interaction with the various components of the criminal justice system as victims, offenders, and employees. Each of these three categories of women will be covered in the context of police, courts, and corrections. Additionally, issues relating to the rights women have in American society will be covered from a historical and contemporary perspective.

CJ 5317 Juvenile Delinquency (3-0).  This course will focus on the nature and extent of delinquent behavior, theories of delinquency and their implications for intervention, cultural and social factors related to delinquency, as well as the philosophy and functioning of the juvenile justice system.  Emphasis will be placed on school related delinquency, the role of the media in creating delinquency panics, and the differences between males and females.

CJ 5318 Seminar in Criminal Justice Theory (3-0).  An advanced study of theories used in Criminal Justice to explain crime and deviance. This course will require students to explain criminal and deviant behavior and apply their theoretical understanding to policy issues. (Required for CJ Masters)

CJ 5319 Use of Force in Criminal Justice (3-0).  Study of the use of and legal rules and concepts involved in the use of force by criminal justice personnel. The course will include both legal and conceptual dimensions of the issue. Among topics to be covered are force continuums, non-lethal force, verbal judo, and alternatives to using force.

CJ 5321 Domestic Violence (3-0).  This course will cover topics relating to domestic violence including spousal abuse, other types of family abuse, and caretaker abuse.  Discussion will include possible explanations for the abuse, reasons why the victims stay, and intervention issues.

CJ 5322 Immigration Issues (3-0).  This course will focus on the history and development of immigration patterns and policies in the United States.  Emphasis will be placed on policy issues as related to the work of Criminal Justice practitioners, particularly in the post 9-11 world. Students will also be expected to analyze policy impact on various groups of immigrants.

CJ 5323 Homeland Security (3-0).  This course will explore the various aspects of the government entity – Homeland Security. Discussion will focus on defining the role for this agency, government restructuring, legal basis for actions and the various divisions within the agency.   Also, special projects undertaken in support of the agency’s mission will be discussed with emphasis on the effects these will have on the various levels of government and the civilian population. (Required for HS Masters)

CJ 5324 Social Deviance (3-0). This course focuses on the concept of deviance, deviant behaviors, and explanations of such behaviors. Although criminal behavior is considered a form of deviance, there are plenty of legal and quasi-legal behaviors that also fall under this category. In the course, we will discuss a variety of behaviors considered deviant, such as smoking, drinking, drug use and sexual activity.

CJ 5325 Graduate Seminar in CJ (3-0).  The student will explore legal issues, ethics, and application of criminological theories in policy making and research methods in the field of criminal justice. Historical issues and emerging trends will also be examined. This course is the capstone course for the Criminal Justice Master’s program.  Prerequisite: Minimum 27 hours completed towards the CJ master’s degree. (Required for CJ Masters)

CJ 5326 Victimology (3-0).  This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding criminal victimization.  Topics covered will include types of victims, reactions to victims by society and the criminal justice system, and the victim rights movement.

CJ 5327 Graduate Seminar in Homeland Security (3-0).  The student will explore government restructuring, policy making, and research methods in the field of Homeland Security.  The role of both government and non-government actors in Homeland Security will be examined.  Historical issues and emerging trends will also be analyzed. The course is the capstone course for the Homeland Security Master’s program.  Prerequisite: Minimum 27 hours completed towards the CJ master’s degree. (Required for HS Masters)

CJ 5328 Seminar on Transnational Crimes (3-0).  This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of criminal organizations and their crimes on the global stage.  Focus is particularly on those organizations and crimes that cross international boundaries.  Areas of study include organized crime, trafficking in drugs, humans and weapons, piracy, and other crimes group s and individual criminals.  Global efforts and prevention, interdiction and punishment will also be covered.  A particular focus will be on placing these issues in the context of Homeland Security and the war on terror.

CJ 5329 Seminar in Emergency Management and Disaster Preparedness (3-0).  This course covers risk management and disaster management theory, risk assessment, protection of critical infrastructure, Incident Command Systems, FEMA strategies and other efforts to prevent and mitigate terrorist attacks, natural disasters and other large-scale events.  The role of all levels of government, military and citizenry will be examined.

CJ 5330 Emerging Issues in Homeland Security (3-0).  This course covers current and emerging issues in the area of Homeland Security.  Topics may include programs, emerging technologies, and legal trends in both the domestic arena and on the global stage.

CJ 5331 Topics in Criminal Justice (3-0).  Intensive study of selected issues in Criminal Justice. May be repeated when topic varies.

CJ 5333 Internship (0-3). Supervised work experience in an approved criminal justice agency. Designed to allow the student to synthesize theory and practice. It is the student’s responsibility to find a suitable agency at which to intern. To be eligible the student must have a minimum GPA of 3.5. A minimum of 45 supervised hours will be required. A student’s compensated employment may not be utilized as an internship. Prerequisite: Permission of the Graduate Coordinator.

CJ 5334 Methods of Social Research (3-0). An introduction to research methods within the social sciences and the major contemporary approaches to it. (Required for CJ and HS Masters)

CJ 5335 Human Trafficking (3-0). This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding human trafficking. Topics covered will include the rise of human trafficking, the financial side of human trafficking, legislation and regional perspectives on human trafficking as well as women and children as sex slaves.

CJ 5336 Seminar on Domestic Terrorism (3-0).  This class is specifically designed to introduce students to the threat of domestic terrorism.  We will discuss the implications of all aspects of such terrorism on U.S. society and on the world at large.  We will address the root causes of such behavior and the international response to incidents and actors.  Additional focus will be on the application of “The Patriot Act” as it impacts U.S. freedoms.

CJ 5337 Seminar on International Terrorism (3-0).  This class is specifically designed to introduce students to the global threat of international terrorism. We will discuss the implications of all aspects of such terrorism on U.S. society. We will address the root causes of such behavior and the criminal justice response to incidents and actors. Additional focus will be on the Department of Homeland Security and its anti-terrorism programs and policies.

CJ 5338 Cybersecurity (3-0).  This course introduces students to the wide range of modern communication technologies. Use of these technologies by government and business entities for intelligence gathering, their limitations, and vulnerabilities are introduced to the students. An overview of the history of computer hacking is covered. Additionally, a brief overview of law and policy concerning cyber communications are discussed beginning with the National Security Act of 1947.

CJ 5339 Ethical Issues in the Criminal Justice System (3-0). Students will examine ethical issues related to criminal justice administration. The origin and effect of ethical standards as well as ethical leadership will be addressed. Emphasis on the role of ethical decision making in policy making and the establishment of agency values, as well as the value paradigm of community policing will be explored.

CJ 5340 Policy Making in Criminal Justice (3-0). Students will explore a comprehensive overview of policy making within law enforcement including the history of law enforcement administration, the evolution of professional policing, and current issues and trends. (Required for HS Masters)

CJ 5341 Criminal Sexual Behavior (3-0). Students will evaluate the nature and etiology of sex crimes and avenues by which the criminal justice system addresses these crimes and criminals. Law and policies related to sex offender control and registration, and best practices regarding treatment and therapies for various types of sex offenders will be discussed.

CJ 5342 Women in Policing (3-0). This course will examine the role of women in law enforcement positions across the United States including historical and contemporary perspectives on women in policing. The experience of women of color will be emphasized.

CJ 5343 Crimes Against Children (3-0). This course focuses on, child maltreatment, neglect and abuse (physical, sexual, psychological). Students will discuss extreme forms of abuse, such as child sexual trafficking and forced prostitution. Students will also study those who commit these crimes and intervention and prevention strategies.

CJ 5350 Independent Study (3-0).  The student will pursue an independent research or experiential learning project chosen by the student in consultation and approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor

CJ 5360 Seminar in Cybercrime (3-0). This course discusses how perpetrators use high-technical means in order to commit a diverse range of criminal activities. These include attacks against computer data and systems, identity theft, and distribution of child sexual abuse images, internet fraud, the penetration of online financial services, as well as the deployment of viruses, Botnets, and various email scams such as phishing. Methods of mitigation and prevention are addressed.

CJ 5361 Seminar in Criminal Profiling (3-0). Students will examine the dynamics of individual criminal acts utilizing inductive and deductive methodology to profile criminal behavior, offender characteristics, crime scene investigation, evidence collection, and case linkage of specific categories of crime. Topical areas in this seminar will include cybercrime, serial crime, stalking, and other criminal behaviors and acts related to technology grounded crimes.

CJ 5362 Criminology of Cybercrime (3-0). This course will discuss various types of criminal conduct associated with computers and the Internet. Specific emphasis will be placed on, and will assess, criminological theories of crime as they relate to cybercrime and cyber terrorism.

CJ 5363 Seminar in Cybercrime Law and Policy (3-0). This course addresses issues related to how emerging technologies challenge existing legal paradigms; how countries regulate criminality across political boundaries; what the new paradigm means for individual rights and privacy; and how law enforcement is evolving to meet the demands of the modern world. This course includes an in-depth analysis of case law and various statues related to cyber intrusions, data theft, and crimes against persons.

CJ 5364 Seminar in Cyber Warfare (3-0). This course explores an in-depth analysis of the policy, doctrine, and strategy of conducting warfare at the national and international level. This course will examine cyber terrorism, cyber espionage, and other attack paradigms, as well as an examination of defense strategies to repel attacks.

CJ 5365 Seminar in Cybercrime Investigations (3-0). This course is a graduate level seminar in the investigation of cybercrimes, with a particular emphasis on Internet fraud schemes, e-Commerce, and dark web related criminal activity. The course also discusses legal issues, investigative techniques and strategies, and implications of investigations based on jurisdictional limitations.

CRIM 3300 History of Criminal Justice (3-0).  A survey of criminal justice history; a study relating to the developments in American law, police practice and penology in Western civilization. Major American and European theories of criminal justice are studied.

CRIM 3302 Victimology (3-0).  Provides an in-depth study of factors that affect victims of crime. Specific crimes are studied and remedies explored; victim precipitation, self-help and prevention of victimization, victimization surveys and other data sources; history of victims’ rights and the victims’ rights movement and victim services.

CRIM 3304 Law & Society (3-0).  An analysis of the American criminal justice system; an overview of  the  history,  philosophy,  and  contemporary  functions of the separate institutions which contribute to the process; the police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice systems will be examined for their contributions, assumptions, and interrelations.

CRIM 3305 Substantive Law (3-0).  A study of the philosophical foundations of American law; a survey of applied criminal law with an emphasis on the most common criminal offenses; an examination of the Texas Penal Code.

CRIM 3306 Community Corrections (3-0).  This course will focus on community corrections in the criminal justice system as an alternative to institutionalization. Students will examine the treatment and rehabilitation concepts; probation and parole techniques; statutory and case law; case management; agency organization and administration.

CRIM 3308 Law of Evidence (3-0).  An examination of the rules of evidence and the procedures for obtaining it with special emphasis on application in criminal court.

CRIM 3312 Criminal Investigation (3-0).  Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; case and trial preparation, photography.

CRIM 3316 Domestic Violence (3-0). This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding victims and perpetrators of domestic violence. Topics covered will include victim and perpetrator characteristics explanations for the violence and explanations for the victim’s behavior. Criminal justice responses to domestic violence situations both currently and historically will also be covered.

CRIM 3340 Criminal Justice Ethics (3-0).  An Analysis of ethical dilemmas in the criminal justice system. An exploration into situational ethics relating to practices in Criminal Justice system. This course will address many ethical scenarios encountered by law enforcement, prosecutors, court officers, and corrections staff in the performance of their duties. Students will develop an understanding of the moral and ethical issues as well as how these dilemmas are resolved.

CRIM 3341 Research Methods for Criminal Justice (3-1). This course provides as introduction to criminal justice research methods. Students will learn how to evaluate current and conduct contemporary research in the field of criminal justice. The course introduces students to terminology and tools of the scientific method. Several data collection techniques available to criminal justice researchers are explored and evaluated Students will learn how to evaluate academic research products in terns if their contribution to the fields of criminal justice as well as to how to develop their own research problems. (Required for CJ and HS)

CRIM 4300 American Corrections (3-0).  An overview of state and federal correctional systems; methods of treatment of offenders and humanistic approach to corrections, institutional and community sanctions, and correctional administration is studied.

CRIM 4302 Constitutional Law (3-0).  An analysis of the role of the U.S. Supreme Court and the appellant courts in protecting individual rights and civil liberties with a focus on litigation involving provisions of the Bill of Rights.

CRIM 4304 Criminology (3-0).  Study of factors that contribute to crime; criminological theories; criminal typologies; crime trends; and criminal deviance.

CRIM 4305 Procedural Law (3-0).  A study of criminal procedure and the procedural rules for the judicial enforcement of criminal law; a survey of due process; and an examination of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure.

CRIM 4306 Individual Research (3-0).  Research projects  to  be  offered    as individual study under the supervision and guidance of the instructor. Permission is required from the instructor and/or Department Chair before enrolling.

CRIM 4307 Internship (3-0).  The course has been designed to give students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to actual practice. Students who qualify are assigned to work at a federal, state, or local agency in the criminal justice arena while attending a weekly seminar on campus. Internships may be repeated for additional credit at a different agency.

CRIM 4309 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3-0).  A seminar course addressing various aspects of the criminal justice system; topics are subject to change with each semester.

CRIM 4310 American Courts (3-0).  A survey of the Dynamics of the state and federal judicial system; the interrelated relationship of the judge, jury, prosecutor, and defense; judicial theory, and an in-depth study of the criminal case within the court.

CRIM 4313 Juvenile Delinquency and Law (3-0).  This course will focus on the nature and extent of juvenile deviant behavior; deviancy theories; juvenile statutory and case law; judicial processes; policies and police practices related to juvenile justice.

CRIM 4324 Immigration Law and Policy (3-0).  This course will focus on the history and development of immigration patterns and policies in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on policy issues as related to the work of Criminal Justice practitioners, particularly in the post-9/11 world. Students will also be expected to analyze policy impact on various groups of immigrants.

CRIM 4330 Law Enforcement Administration (3-0).  Students will explore a comprehensive overview of practices within law enforcement administration. The history of law enforcement administration, the evolution of professional policing, as well as current issues and trends will be addressed. Emphasis will be places on issues related to human resource administration and the leadership skills required to successfully manage a law enforcement agency.

CRIM 4332 Constitutional Issues in Corrections (3-0).  In the course, students will explore the origins of correctional systems, and how these systems and correctional philosophies have evolved over time. Students will also study the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendment rights and the theories behind those rights, as they relate to convicted prisoners and pretrial detainees. The impact of court decisions on prisons and jails. Liability and immunity of correctional personnel.

CRIM 4335 Drug Identification and Enforcement (3-0).  Lectures, demonstrations, and discussions that address all aspects of drug law, identification and analysis with an emphasis on those related to law enforcement.  Illicit drugs are examined for their societal impact.

CRIM 4337 Forensic Science (3-0).  The science of fingerprints and DNA is examined; a study of criminalistics  and the techniques employed in the recovery, classification, and identification of crime scene evidence; the analysis and interpretation of physical evidence.

CRIM 4368 Multiculturalism in the Criminal Justice System (3-0).  Understanding, communicating and working with persons from different cultures; basic human relations skills needed by those working in the criminal justice system; women in the criminal justice system; equal protection of the law and anti-discrimination, civil rights, sexual harassment and related laws; criminal justice ethics.